Bionatura
Bionatura
Latin American Journal of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
Latin American Journal of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
Go to content
2021.06.03.1 - Copiar
Files > Volume 6 > Vol 6 No 4 2021
EDITORIAL

Hybrid immunity: the immune response of COVID-19 survivors to vaccination.


Marlon Gancino 1, Nelson Santiago Vispo 2
Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.21931/RB/2021.06.03.1

By the time writing this editorial, around nineteen months (Dec 2019) has passed since the first report of a Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak in individuals of Wuhan, China1. Also, it has been more than sixteen months (Mar 2020) since the declaration of the Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO)1. The evolution and rapid scattering of this novel coronavirus have trapped in an unprecedented global public health crisis, which, so far, has reached 196,553,009 people around the globe, provoking 4,200,412 deaths (31st July 2021)1.

The global endeavor of defeating contagion has achieved groundbreaking events such as the fastest development and massive application of effective vaccines in history2. Currently, +500 SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are being developed over the full spectrum of platforms (i.e., non-viral vector, viral vector, inactivated and live-attenuated virus, and recombinant vaccines); some of which are already pre-clinical and clinical studies2,3. Remarkably, ten vaccines are already available on the market4, from which, by the end of July 2021, +3800 million doses have been administered1. Complemented by non-pharmaceutical strategies (e.g., restrictions on international mobility), inducing protective immunity to SARS-CoV-2 massively until attaining herd immunity appears to be the definitive solution to overcome this pandemic5.

We are reaching milestones daily, so some exciting questions have been raised about immunological memory – the fundamental of protective immunology. This response coordinated by a synchronized orchestra of antibodies, memory B cells, memory CD4+ T cells, and memory CD8+ T cells remains poorly understood6. Either infection (natural immunity) or vaccination (vaccine-induced immunity) can trigger immunological memory against SARS-CoV-2, and all nuances in such complexity may provoke different biological outcomes7. Diverse investigations have concluded that either path to immunity can confer specific protection to COVID-198–11. Moreover, they have discussed the question: what does it occur when these immunities are overlapped? Acquiring knowledge on the immune response dynamics that convalescent individuals who are subsequently vaccinated develop is essential. The deep understanding of this “hybrid immunity” will allow the design of appropriate vaccination regimes for the vast population of previously infected individuals12.

Observations on the response kinetics of immune memory from naturally immunized cohorts have found that ~95% of subjects can develop a stable immunity against reinfection, which may last moderately declining over a year after symptoms onset6,13. Relevantly, such protective immunity suffers a considerable weakening in the face of current circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) – i.e., B.1.1.7 (Alpha), B.1.351 (Beta), P.1 (Gamma), and B.1.617.2 (Delta) – when compared with the wild-type Wuhan-Hu-1 variant4,14–16. As identified by previous works, multiple spike (S) protein mutations in VOCs explain their ability to escape neutralization antibody activity partially, making the acquired natural protective immunology less effective7,12.

Although to a milder degree, reduction to VOCs neutralization has also been seen in vaccine immunized people16. Currently, four main types of vaccines govern the market: mRNA-lipid nanoparticle-based non-viral vectors (BNT162b2 by Pfizer-BioNTech, and mRNA-1273 by Moderna), adenovirus-based viral vectors (ChAdOx1-nCoV-19 by AstraZeneca, Ad26.COV2.S by Johnson & Johnson, Ad5-nCoV by CanSino Biologics, and Sputnik V by Gamaleya), inactivated virus (CoronaVac by Sinovac, BBV152 by Bharat Biotech,  WIBP-CorV by Sinopharm (Wuhan), and BBIBP-CorV by Sinopharm (Beijing)), and recombinant protein subunits (NVX-CoV2373 by Novavax)3,4. Phase 3 clinical trials showed good overall vaccine efficacies that ranged from ~95% (BNT162b2) to >50% (CoronaVac) at preventing COVID-19 illness, commonly after a two-dose prime-boost regime17. In such a sense, it has been observed that vaccination protection effectiveness slightly reduces against VOCs, Delta variant being associated with the highest transmissibility and ability to avoid antibody neutralization16. However, although less potent to VOCs, preliminary research suggests that vaccines probably remain efficacious8,11,16,18. Now, it is statistically modelized that vaccine-induced neutralization activity would decay in a long non-linearly fashion, causing the vaccines with initial efficacy of 95% to preserve 77% efficacy in a 250-day span19.

Identifying the differences between natural and vaccine-induced immunities directs us to the proper interrogation: what is there at their interface? As mentioned earlier, numerous research groups have addressed this question, and their results suggest that hybrid immunity has a more robust protective performance than either immunity. In a synergistic character, researchers have seen that previously infected vaccinees mount cross-variant neutralization reactogenicity to the first vaccine dose, which equals or surpasses the observed in naïve individuals after the second vaccine shot5,7,8,11,16,20,21.




Reports in this regard informed the occurrence of anamnestic reactions in diverse cohorts of previously infected vaccinees after receiving the first vaccine dose of either BNT162b2, mRNA-1273, or ChAdOx1-nCoV-19 with no apparent improvement after the second dose7–9,11,17,21. According to Goel et al. and Kramer et al., as anticipated, only COVID-19 survivors present detectable levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies specialized to recognize the full-length SARS-CoV-2 S protein (anti-S IgG) or the SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) (anti-RBD IgG) – antibodies associated with SARS-CoV-2 neutralization responses13– before vaccination17,22. As observed, titers of anti-S IgG and anti-RBD IgG are higher in individuals with a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection pre- and post-vaccination (compared with naïve subjects at the exact sampling times)17,20,23. The first vaccine dose induces a variable and inadequate response of neutralizing antibodies generation in SARS-CoV-2–unexposed individuals, which boosts the second vaccination24. Contrary, the first vaccine dose triggers a uniform and rapid amplification of anti-S IgGs and anti-RBD IgGs titers in SARS-CoV-2 experienced individuals10,11. While naïve and COVID-19 asymptomatic vaccinees’ antibody titers are significantly boosted after the second vaccine dose21, no significant improvement has been detected in participants with preexisting immunity after the boosting dose, suggesting a possible plateau in the neutralization antibody activity9,11,20.

Interestingly, as informed by Ebinger et al., neutralizing antibodies levels in naïve individuals who received the first vaccine dose were slightly higher when contrasted with the baseline state of previously infected individuals23. In their research, neutralizing antibody levels were statistically similar in both groups, only if compared to the group of previously infected individuals after the first dose with the group of naïve individuals after completing a two-dose vaccination regime23. Also, higher frequencies of vaccine-related systemic side effects (e.g., fever, headache, muscle pain, and fatigue) have been associated with COVID-19 convalescent individuals and high IgG responses9.

As a complement, the humoral immune response of SARS-CoV-2–exposed individuals is boosted above the protective threshold after the first vaccination dose, even against VOCs8,16. Planas et al. noticed that sera from previously infected one-dose vaccinees displayed a significant increase in neutralizing antibody titers against Alpha, Beta, and Delta SARS-CoV-2 variants, in contrast with non-vaccinated convalescent people16. On the contrary, such cross-variant neutralization activity was observed in naïve individuals just days after the second vaccine immunization. Therefore, these emerging data highly advise that SARS-CoV-2 experienced individuals subsequently vaccinated may develop a broad protective immunity against all spreading VOCs7,16.

Every compartment of the adaptative immune systems is probably involved in prompting this non-anticipated hybrid immunity behaviour7. Broadly, as part of the immune response against infection, long-live memory B cells by a previous induction of T cells (specifically, T follicular helper cells) start compiling mutations in immunoglobulin variable gene sequences (somatic hypermutations (SHM)) in favor of a future generation of high-affinity antibodies13. Thus, evolved memory B cells can be recruited post-vaccination, which will differentiate into plasma cells producing highly potent neutralizing antibodies13. It has been observed that memory B cells continue accumulating somatic mutations over 12 months in germinal centers in individuals who have recovered from COVID-1913,25. Those mutations accumulated long after infection are, indeed, though accountable for the high potency in serum neutralization activity of the convalescent vaccinee cohorts against VOCs12. Although the study performed by Goel et al. it was not found any change in the levels of SHMs in memory B cell clones from convalescent individuals as a response to vaccination17, naïve vaccinees also would enter into this memory B cell maturation after antigen exposure (vaccination), if analyzed after long spans12.

The prime-boost regime strategy chose for most vaccines relies on mounting protective responses through memory recall to antigen reexposure7. The natural SARS-CoV-2 infection primes convalescent populations. This primary encounter with the virus promotes the previously infected individuals to develop a T cell memory response to a vast epitope repertoire of the 25 SARS-CoV-2 proteins (S and non-S viral proteins), which according to several studies, are maintained in VOCs7,15,20. Most commercial vaccines induce a protective response using only the SARS-CoV-2 S-protein8,11. Accordingly, vaccine priming activates a T cell memory to a restricted number of epitopes in naïve individuals (compared to SARS-CoV-2–exposed individuals)7. Therefore, the reactivation of broad infection-primed T cell memory response and the recruitment of long-live mutated memory B cell after first vaccine dose in SARS-CoV-2–exposed individuals probably play a role in the astounding response kinetics of hybrid immunity20.

The boosting vaccine dose produced in B and T cell kinetics is remarkably similar to the one observed in the serological analysis. That is, boosting effect of the second vaccine dose was only observed in naïve individual8,11,17,20. Humoral and cellular immunity of convalescent vaccinees may reach an activity plateau after the first vaccine dose20. In this sense, the study of Lozano-Ojalvo et al. reported a reduction in T cell responses in COVID-19 recovered individuals after the second vaccine dose20. Taken together, those results reveal that convalescing individuals may request an alternative vaccination regime different that the current prime-boost one developed in naïve individuals.

Global health systems are still battling a colossal challenge aggravated by the shortage in vaccine supply and the occurrence and dissemination of VOCs5,21. Vaccine policies are being discussed worldwide, proposing several strategies to address herd immunity to protect their populations15,24. A clear example was seen in the United Kingdom when authorities approved extending the time interval between vaccine dosages to apply the first vaccine immunization to the most significant number of citizens8. However, as above expose, one dose in naïve individuals may not be enough to protect them from VOCs, such as the Delta variant16.

Hybrid immunity can become a turning-point opportunity to defeat the infection in context with the current pandemic scenario. Adopting policies aligned with the data mentioned above may be particularly beneficial for regions like Latin America. While this region shares only ~5% of the world population, it accumulates +16% of the ~200 million COVID-19 total cases, so far reported1. Acknowledging the reduced diagnostic capabilities of these countries, this entire area is probably one of the most affected globally, leading to one of the more numerous populations of convalescent people. From both an economic and pharmacological perspective, applying a one-dose regime of pertinent vaccines to convalescent individuals is sustainable5. As COVID-19 survivors may need just one vaccination to achieve high levels of protective immunity, massive antibody screening for SARS-CoV-2 spike antibodies could help prioritize and free up doses, optimize vaccine supply efficiency, and surpass problems linked to the current vaccine manufacturing bottleneck5,25,26.

Finally, as all cited reports were performed considering vaccines developed over only mRNA-lipid nanoparticle-based non-viral vectors and adenovirus-based viral vectors, it is vital to extend the research to the rest of marketed vaccines and figure out if the same “hybrid immunity” principles apply to them.

REFERENCES

1.           World Health Organization. Coronavirus (COVID-19) Dashboard. World Health Organization (2021). Available at: https://covid19.who.int/. (Accessed: 31st July 2021)
2.           Hrkach, J. & Langer, R. From micro to nano: evolution and impact of drug delivery in treating disease. Drug Deliv. Transl. Res. 10, 567–570 (2020).
3.           Li, Q., Wang, J., Tang, Y. & Lu, H. Next-generation COVID-19 vaccines: Opportunities for vaccine development and challenges in tackling COVID-19. Drug Discov. Ther. 15, 2021.01058 (2021).
4.           Focosi, D., Tuccori, M., Baj, A. & Maggi, F. SARS-CoV-2 Variants: A Synopsis of In Vitro Efficacy Data of Convalescent Plasma, Currently Marketed Vaccines, and Monoclonal Antibodies. Viruses 13, 1211 (2021).
5.           Focosi, D., Baj, A. & Maggi, F. Is a single COVID-19 vaccine dose enough in convalescents ? Hum. Vaccines Immunother. 00, 1–3 (2021).
6.           Dan, J. M. et al. Immunological memory to SARS-CoV-2 assessed for up to 8 months after infection. Science 371, eabf4063 (2021).
7.           Crotty, S. Hybrid immunity. Science 372, 1392–1393 (2021).
8.           Reynolds, C. J. et al. Prior SARS-CoV-2 infection rescues B and T cell responses to variants after first vaccine dose. Science 372, 1418–1423 (2021).
9.           Sasikala, M. et al. Immunological memory and neutralizing activity to a single dose of COVID-19 vaccine in previously infected individuals. Int. J. Infect. Dis. 108, 183–186 (2021).
10.         Saadat, S. et al. Binding and Neutralization Antibody Titers After a Single Vaccine Dose in Health Care Workers Previously Infected With SARS-CoV-2. JAMA 325, 1467 (2021).
11.         Stamatatos, L. et al. mRNA vaccination boosts cross-variant neutralizing antibodies elicited by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Science 372, 1413–1418 (2021).
12.         Purushotham, J. N., van Doremalen, N. & Munster, V. J. SARS-CoV-2 vaccines: anamnestic response in previously infected recipients. Cell Res. 2–3 (2021). doi:10.1038/s41422-021-00516-7
13.         Wang, Z. et al. Naturally enhanced neutralizing breadth against SARS-CoV-2 one year after infection. Nature (2021). doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03696-9
14.         Moyo-Gwete, T. et al. Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Antibody Responses Elicited by SARS-CoV-2 501Y.V2 (B.1.351). N. Engl. J. Med. 384, 2161–2163 (2021).
15.         Noh, J. Y., Jeong, H. W. & Shin, E. C. SARS-CoV-2 mutations, vaccines, and immunity: implication of variants of concern. Signal Transduct. Target. Ther. 6, 3–4 (2021).
16.         Planas, D. et al. Reduced sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 variant Delta to antibody neutralization. Nature (2021). doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03777-9
17.         Goel, R. R. et al. Distinct antibody and memory B cell responses in SARSCoV-2 naïve and recovered individuals following mRNA vaccination. Sci. Immunol. 6, 1–19 (2021).
18.         Jalkanen, P. et al. COVID-19 mRNA vaccine induced antibody responses against three SARS-CoV-2 variants. Nat. Commun. 12, 1–11 (2021).
19.         Khoury, D. S. et al. Neutralizing antibody levels are highly predictive of immune protection from symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Nat. Med. 27, (2021).
20.         Lozano-Ojalvo, D. et al. Differential Effects of the Second SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine Dose on T Cell Immunity in Naïve and COVID-19 Recovered Individuals. SSRN Electron. J. 1–9 (2021). doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.03.22.436441
21.         Levi, R. et al. One dose of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine exponentially increases antibodies in individuals who have recovered from symptomatic COVID-19. J. Clin. Invest. 131, (2021).
22.         Krammer, F. et al. Antibody Responses in Seropositive Persons after a Single Dose of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine. N. Engl. J. Med. 384, 1372–1374 (2021).
23.         Ebinger, J. E. et al. Antibody responses to the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine in individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2. Nat. Med. 27, 981–984 (2021).
24.         Frieman, M. et al. SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for all but a single dose for COVID-19 survivors. EBioMedicine 68, 103401 (2021).
25.         Turner, J. S. et al. SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines induce persistent human germinal centre responses. Nature (2021). doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03738-2
26.       Zamora-Ledezma, C.; C., D.F.C.; Medina, E.; Sinche, F.; Santiago Vispo, N.; Dahoumane, S.A.; Alexis, F. Biomedical Science to Tackle the COVID-19 Pandemic: Current Status and Future Perspectives. Molecules 2020, 25, 4620. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25204620
Marlon Gancino 1, Nelson Santiago Vispo 2
1.Faculty of Health, NANOMED EMJMD, University of Paris, France
alx.gancino@gmail.com
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4758-2645
2. Professor. Yachay Tech University, School of Biological Sciences and engineering, Hda. San José s/n y Proyecto Yachay, 100119, Urcuquí, . Ecuador.
nvispo@yachaytech.edu.ec
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4081-3984
EDITORIAL

Inmunidad híbrida: la respuesta inmunitaria de los supervivientes de COVID-19 a la vacunación.


Marlon Gancino 1, Nelson Santiago Vispo 2
Disponible en: http://dx.doi.org/10.21931/RB/2021.06.03.1

En el momento de escribir este editorial, han pasado unos diecinueve meses (diciembre de 2019) desde la primera notificación de un brote de Coronavirus del Síndrome Respiratorio Agudo Severo 2 (SARS-CoV-2) en individuos de Wuhan, China1. Asimismo, han pasado más de dieciséis meses (marzo de 2020) desde la declaración de la pandemia de Coronavirus 19 (COVID-19) por parte de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS)1. La evolución y la rápida dispersión de este nuevo coronavirus nos han atrapado en una crisis de salud pública mundial sin precedentes que, hasta el momento, ha alcanzado a 196.553.009 personas en todo el mundo, provocando 4.200.412 muertes (31 de julio de 2021)1.

El esfuerzo mundial para combatir el contagio ha logrado el desarrollo más rápido y la aplicación masiva de vacunas eficaces de la historia, marcando un hito en el campo de la inmunización a nivel global2. En la actualidad, se están desarrollando más de 500 vacunas contra el SARS-CoV-2 en todo el espectro de plataformas (es decir, vacunas con vectores no virales, con vectores virales, con virus inactivados y vivos atenuados, y recombinantes); algunas de las cuales ya se encuentran en estudios preclínicos y clínicos2,3. Cabe destacar que ya hay diez vacunas disponibles en el mercado4, de las cuales, a finales de julio de 2021, se habrán administrado +3800 millones de dosis1. Complementada con estrategias no farmacéuticas (por ejemplo, restricciones a la movilidad internacional), la inducción de inmunidad protectora frente al SARS-CoV-2 de forma masiva, Complementada con estrategias no farmacéuticas (por ejemplo, restricciones a la movilidad internacional), parece ser la solución definitiva para superar esta pandemia5.

Cada día se alcanzan hitos, por lo que se han planteado algunas cuestiones apasionantes sobre la memoria inmunológica y lo fundamental de la inmunología protectora. Esta respuesta coordinada por una orquesta sincronizada de anticuerpos, células B de memoria, células T CD4+ de memoria y células T CD8+ de memoria sigue siendo poco conocida6. Tanto la infección (inmunidad natural) como la vacunación (inmunidad inducida por la vacuna) pueden desencadenar la memoria inmunológica contra el SARS-CoV-2, y todos los matices de esta complejidad pueden provocar resultados biológicos diferentes7. Diversas investigaciones han llegado a la conclusión de que cualquiera de las dos vías de inmunidad puede conferir una protección específica frente al COVID-198-11. Además, se ha discutido la cuestión: ¿qué ocurre cuando estas inmunidades se superponen? Es esencial conocer la dinámica de la respuesta inmunitaria que desarrollan los individuos convalecientes que son posteriormente vacunados. El conocimiento profundo de esta "inmunidad híbrida" permitirá diseñar regímenes de vacunación adecuados para la amplia población de individuos previamente infectados12.

Las observaciones sobre la cinética de respuesta de la memoria inmunitaria de cohortes inmunizados de forma natural han descubierto que el ~95% de los sujetos pueden desarrollar una inmunidad estable contra la reinfección, que puede durar más de un año después del inicio de los síntomas, disminuyendo luego progresivamente6,13. De manera relevante, dicha inmunidad protectora sufre un debilitamiento considerable frente a las variantes de interés (VOC) del SARS-CoV-2 que circulan actualmente, es decir, B.1.1.7 (Alfa), B.1.351 (Beta), P.1 (Gamma) y B.1.617.2 (Delta), en comparación con la variante Wuhan-Hu-1 de tipo salvaje4,14-16. Tal y como se identificó en trabajos anteriores, las múltiples mutaciones de la proteína spike (S) en las VOC explican su capacidad para escapar parcialmente de la actividad de los anticuerpos de neutralización, haciendo que la inmunología protectora natural adquirida sea menos eficaz7,12.

Aunque en menor grado, también se ha observado una reducción de la neutralización de los VOCs en personas inmunizadas con la vacuna16. En la actualidad, cuatro tipos principales de vacunas rigen el mercado: vectores no virales basados en nanopartículas de ARNm (BNT162b2 de Pfizer-BioNTech, y ARNm-1273 de Moderna), vectores virales basados en adenovirus (ChAdOx1-nCoV-19 de AstraZeneca, Ad26.COV2. S de Johnson & Johnson, Ad5-nCoV de CanSino Biologics y Sputnik V de Gamaleya), virus inactivados (CoronaVac de Sinovac, BBV152 de Bharat Biotech, WIBP-CorV de Sinopharm (Wuhan) y BBIBP-CorV de Sinopharm (Pekín)) y subunidades proteicas recombinantes (NVX-CoV2373 de Novavax)3,4. Los ensayos clínicos de fase 3 mostraron una buena eficacia global de la vacuna, que osciló entre el ~95% (BNT162b2) y el >50% (CoronaVac) en la prevención de la enfermedad por COVID-19, normalmente tras un régimen de dos dosis de refuerzo inicial17. En este sentido, se ha observado que la eficacia de protección de la vacunación se reduce ligeramente frente a VOC, siendo la variante Delta la que se asocia con la mayor transmisibilidad y capacidad de evitar la neutralización de anticuerpos16. Sin embargo, aunque sean menos potentes frente a los VOC, las investigaciones preliminares sugieren que las vacunas probablemente siguen siendo eficaces8,11,16,18. Ahora bien, se ha modelado estadísticamente que la actividad de neutralización inducida por la vacuna decaerá de forma no lineal a largo plazo, haciendo que las vacunas con una eficacia inicial del 95% conserven una eficacia del 77% en un lapso de 250 días19.

Identificar las diferencias entre la inmunidad natural y la inducida por la vacuna nos lleva a la siguiente pregunta: ¿qué hay en su interfaz? Como se ha mencionado anteriormente, numerosos grupos de investigación han abordado esta cuestión, y sus resultados sugieren que la inmunidad híbrida tiene un rendimiento protector más sólido que cualquiera de las dos inmunidades. En un carácter sinérgico, los investigadores han visto que los vacunados previamente infectados generan una reactogenicidad de neutralización cruzada a la primera dosis de la vacuna, que iguala o supera la observada en los individuos no infectados (naïve) tras la segunda inyección de la vacuna5,7,8,11,16,20,21.
 



 
Los informes al respecto informaron de la aparición de reacciones anamnésicas (La respuesta inmunitaria secundaria también se denomina respuesta de refuerzo o respuesta anamnésica) en diversos cohortes de vacunados previamente infectados tras recibir la primera dosis de la vacuna, ya sea BNT162b2, ARNm-1273 o ChAdOx1-nCoV-19, pero sin aparente mejora tras la segunda dosis7-9,11,17,21. Según Goel et al. y Kramer et al., tal y como se preveía, sólo los supervivientes de la COVID-19 presentan niveles detectables de anticuerpos de inmunoglobulina G (IgG) especializados en reconocer la proteína S de longitud completa del SARS-CoV-2 (IgG anti-S) o el dominio de unión al receptor (RBD) del SARS-CoV-2 (IgG anti-RBD) -anticuerpos asociados a las respuestas de neutralización del SARS-CoV-213- antes de la vacunación17,22. Como se ha observado, los títulos de IgG anti-S y de IgG anti-RBD son más elevados en los individuos con antecedentes de infección por el SARS-CoV-2 antes y después de la vacunación (en comparación con los sujetos naïve en los mismos momentos de muestreo)17,20,23. La primera dosis de vacuna induce una respuesta variable e inadecuada de generación de anticuerpos neutralizantes en los individuos no expuestos al SARS-CoV-2, lo que potencia la segunda vacunación24. Por el contrario, la primera dosis de vacuna desencadena una amplificación uniforme y rápida de los títulos de IgG anti-S y anti-RBD en los individuos convalecientes del SARS-CoV-210,11. Mientras que los títulos de anticuerpos de los vacunados asintomáticos naïve y COVID-19 aumentan significativamente después de la segunda dosis de la vacuna21, no se ha detectado ninguna mejora significativa en los participantes con inmunidad preexistente después de la dosis de refuerzo, lo que sugiere una posible meseta en la actividad de los anticuerpos de neutralización9,11,20.

Curiosamente, según informan Ebinger et al., los niveles de anticuerpos neutralizantes en los individuos naïve que recibieron la primera dosis de la vacuna fueron ligeramente superiores cuando se contrastaron con el estado de referencia de los individuos previamente infectados23. En su investigación, los niveles de anticuerpos neutralizantes eran estadísticamente similares en ambos grupos, sólo si se comparaba al grupo de individuos previamente infectados después de la primera dosis con el grupo de individuos naïve tras completar un régimen de vacunación de dos dosis23. Además, se han asociado frecuencias más altas de efectos secundarios sistémicos relacionados con la vacuna (por ejemplo, fiebre, dolor de cabeza, dolor muscular y fatiga) con individuos convalecientes de COVID-19 y respuestas IgG elevadas9.

Como complemento, la respuesta inmunitaria humoral de los individuos expuestos al SARS-CoV-2 se potencia por encima del umbral de protección después de la primera dosis de vacunación, incluso contra las VOC8,16. Planas et al. observaron que los sueros de los vacunados con una dosis previamente infectada mostraban un aumento significativo de los títulos de anticuerpos neutralizantes contra las variantes Alfa, Beta y Delta del SARS-CoV-2, en contraste con los de los convalecientes no vacunados16. Por el contrario, dicha actividad de neutralización de las variantes cruzadas se observó en individuos naïve pocos días después de la segunda inmunización de la vacuna. Por lo tanto, estos datos emergentes aconsejan que los individuos infectados con el SARS-CoV-2 y vacunados posteriormente, puedan desarrollar una amplia inmunidad protectora contra todas las VOCs que se propagan.7,16.

Todos los compartimentos de los sistemas inmunitarios adaptativos están probablemente implicados en provocar este comportamiento de inmunidad híbrida no anticipada7. A grandes rasgos, como parte de la respuesta inmunitaria contra la infección, las células B de memoria de larga duración, mediante una inducción previa de las células T (concretamente, las células T auxiliares foliculares), comienzan a recopilar mutaciones en las secuencias genéticas variables de las inmunoglobulinas (hipermutaciones somáticas (SHM)) en favor de una futura generación de anticuerpos de alta afinidad13. Así, se pueden reclutar células B de memoria evolucionadas después de la vacunación, que se diferenciarán en células plasmáticas productoras de anticuerpos neutralizantes altamente potentes13. Se ha observado que las células B de memoria siguen acumulando mutaciones somáticas durante 12 meses en los centros germinales de los individuos que se han recuperado de la COVID-1913,25. Estas mutaciones acumuladas mucho tiempo después de la infección son, de hecho, las responsables de la alta potencia en la actividad de neutralización sérica de las cohortes de vacunados convalecientes frente a COVID12. Aunque en el estudio realizado por Goel et al. no se encontró ningún cambio en los niveles de SHMs en los clones de células B de memoria de individuos convalecientes como respuesta a la vacunación17, los vacunados naïve también entrarían en esta maduración de células B de memoria tras la exposición al antígeno (vacunación), si se analizan después de largos periodos12.

La estrategia de respuesta inmunitaria secundaria o respuesta de refuerzo para la mayoría de las vacunas se basa en la creación de respuestas protectoras mediante el recuerdo de la memoria a la reexposición del antígeno7. La infección natural por el SARS-CoV-2 prepara a las poblaciones convalecientes. Este encuentro primario con el virus hace que los individuos previamente infectados desarrollen una respuesta de memoria de células T a un amplio repertorio de epítopos de las 25 proteínas del SARS-CoV-2 (proteínas virales S y no S), que según varios estudios, se mantienen en los VOCs7,15,20. La mayoría de las vacunas comerciales inducen una respuesta protectora utilizando únicamente la proteína S del SARS-CoV-28,11. En consecuencia, el cebado de la vacuna activa una memoria de células T para un número restringido de epítopos en individuos ingenuos (en comparación con los individuos expuestos al SARS-CoV-2)7. Por lo tanto, la reactivación de la respuesta de memoria de las células T, que se basa en la infección, y el reclutamiento de células B de memoria de larga duración después de la primera dosis de la vacuna en individuos expuestos al SARS-CoV-2 probablemente desempeñen un papel en la asombrosa cinética de respuesta de la inmunidad híbrida20.

La dosis de vacuna potenciadora producida en la cinética de las células B y T es notablemente similar a la observada en el análisis serológico. Es decir, el efecto potenciador de la segunda dosis de vacuna sólo se observó en individuos naïve8,11,17,20. La inmunidad humoral y celular de los vacunados convalecientes puede alcanzar una meseta de actividad tras la primera dosis vacunal20. En este sentido, el estudio de Lozano-Ojalvo et al. informó de una reducción de las respuestas de las células T en los individuos recuperados de COVID-19 después de la segunda dosis de la vacuna20. En conjunto, estos resultados revelan que los individuos convalecientes pueden solicitar un régimen de vacunación alternativo diferente a la actual dosis de refuerzo desarrollado en individuos naïve.

Los sistemas sanitarios mundiales siguen luchando contra un reto colosal agravado por la escasez en el suministro de vacunas y la aparición y diseminación de VOCs5,21. En todo el mundo se están debatiendo políticas de vacunación que proponen varias estrategias para abordar la inmunidad de rebaño con el fin de proteger a sus poblaciones15,24. Un ejemplo claro se vio en el Reino Unido cuando las autoridades aprobaron ampliar el intervalo de tiempo entre las dosis de vacunas para aplicar la primera inmunización de la vacuna al número más significativo de ciudadanos8. Sin embargo, como se ha expuesto anteriormente, una dosis en individuos naïve puede no ser suficiente para protegerlos de las VOC, como la variante Delta16.

La inmunidad híbrida puede convertirse en una oportunidad para vencer la infección en el contexto del actual escenario pandémico. La adopción de políticas alineadas con los datos mencionados anteriormente puede ser especialmente beneficiosas para regiones como América Latina. Aunque esta región comparte sólo el ~5% de la población mundial, acumula el +16% de los ~200 millones de casos totales de COVID-19, reportados hasta ahora1. Teniendo en cuenta las reducidas capacidades de diagnóstico de estos países, toda esta zona es probablemente una de las más afectadas a nivel mundial, dando lugar a una de las poblaciones más numerosas de personas convalecientes. Tanto desde el punto de vista económico como farmacológico, la aplicación de un régimen de una sola dosis de las vacunas pertinentes a los individuos convalecientes es sostenible5. Dado que los supervivientes de la COVID-19 pueden necesitar una sola vacunación para alcanzar niveles elevados de inmunidad protectora, el cribado masivo de anticuerpos contra la proteína spike del SARS-CoV-2 podría ayudar a priorizar y liberar dosis, optimizar la eficiencia del suministro de vacunas y superar los problemas relacionados con el actual cuello de botella en la fabricación de vacunas5,25,26.

Por último, dado que todos los informes citados se realizaron teniendo en cuenta las vacunas desarrolladas únicamente sobre vectores no virales basados en nanopartículas de ARNm y vectores virales basados en adenovirus, es vital ampliar la investigación al resto de vacunas comercializadas y averiguar si se aplican a ellas los mismos principios de "inmunidad híbrida".


REFERENCIAS

1.           World Health Organization. Coronavirus (COVID-19) Dashboard. World Health Organization (2021). Available at: https://covid19.who.int/. (Accessed: 31st July 2021)
2.           Hrkach, J. & Langer, R. From micro to nano: evolution and impact of drug delivery in treating disease. Drug Deliv. Transl. Res. 10, 567–570 (2020).
3.           Li, Q., Wang, J., Tang, Y. & Lu, H. Next-generation COVID-19 vaccines: Opportunities for vaccine development and challenges in tackling COVID-19. Drug Discov. Ther. 15, 2021.01058 (2021).
4.           Focosi, D., Tuccori, M., Baj, A. & Maggi, F. SARS-CoV-2 Variants: A Synopsis of In Vitro Efficacy Data of Convalescent Plasma, Currently Marketed Vaccines, and Monoclonal Antibodies. Viruses 13, 1211 (2021).
5.           Focosi, D., Baj, A. & Maggi, F. Is a single COVID-19 vaccine dose enough in convalescents ? Hum. Vaccines Immunother. 00, 1–3 (2021).
6.           Dan, J. M. et al. Immunological memory to SARS-CoV-2 assessed for up to 8 months after infection. Science 371, eabf4063 (2021).
7.           Crotty, S. Hybrid immunity. Science 372, 1392–1393 (2021).
8.           Reynolds, C. J. et al. Prior SARS-CoV-2 infection rescues B and T cell responses to variants after first vaccine dose. Science 372, 1418–1423 (2021).
9.           Sasikala, M. et al. Immunological memory and neutralizing activity to a single dose of COVID-19 vaccine in previously infected individuals. Int. J. Infect. Dis. 108, 183–186 (2021).
10.         Saadat, S. et al. Binding and Neutralization Antibody Titers After a Single Vaccine Dose in Health Care Workers Previously Infected With SARS-CoV-2. JAMA 325, 1467 (2021).
11.         Stamatatos, L. et al. mRNA vaccination boosts cross-variant neutralizing antibodies elicited by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Science 372, 1413–1418 (2021).
12.         Purushotham, J. N., van Doremalen, N. & Munster, V. J. SARS-CoV-2 vaccines: anamnestic response in previously infected recipients. Cell Res. 2–3 (2021). doi:10.1038/s41422-021-00516-7
13.         Wang, Z. et al. Naturally enhanced neutralizing breadth against SARS-CoV-2 one year after infection. Nature (2021). doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03696-9
14.         Moyo-Gwete, T. et al. Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Antibody Responses Elicited by SARS-CoV-2 501Y.V2 (B.1.351). N. Engl. J. Med. 384, 2161–2163 (2021).
15.         Noh, J. Y., Jeong, H. W. & Shin, E. C. SARS-CoV-2 mutations, vaccines, and immunity: implication of variants of concern. Signal Transduct. Target. Ther. 6, 3–4 (2021).
16.         Planas, D. et al. Reduced sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 variant Delta to antibody neutralization. Nature (2021). doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03777-9
17.         Goel, R. R. et al. Distinct antibody and memory B cell responses in SARSCoV-2 naïve and recovered individuals following mRNA vaccination. Sci. Immunol. 6, 1–19 (2021).
18.         Jalkanen, P. et al. COVID-19 mRNA vaccine induced antibody responses against three SARS-CoV-2 variants. Nat. Commun. 12, 1–11 (2021).
19.         Khoury, D. S. et al. Neutralizing antibody levels are highly predictive of immune protection from symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Nat. Med. 27, (2021).
20.         Lozano-Ojalvo, D. et al. Differential Effects of the Second SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine Dose on T Cell Immunity in Naïve and COVID-19 Recovered Individuals. SSRN Electron. J. 1–9 (2021). doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.03.22.436441
21.         Levi, R. et al. One dose of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine exponentially increases antibodies in individuals who have recovered from symptomatic COVID-19. J. Clin. Invest. 131, (2021).
22.         Krammer, F. et al. Antibody Responses in Seropositive Persons after a Single Dose of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine. N. Engl. J. Med. 384, 1372–1374 (2021).
23.         Ebinger, J. E. et al. Antibody responses to the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine in individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2. Nat. Med. 27, 981–984 (2021).
24.         Frieman, M. et al. SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for all but a single dose for COVID-19 survivors. EBioMedicine 68, 103401 (2021).
25.         Turner, J. S. et al. SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines induce persistent human germinal centre responses. Nature (2021). doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03738-2
26.       Zamora-Ledezma, C.; C., D.F.C.; Medina, E.; Sinche, F.; Santiago Vispo, N.; Dahoumane, S.A.; Alexis, F. Biomedical Science to Tackle the COVID-19 Pandemic: Current Status and Future Perspectives. Molecules 2020, 25, 4620. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25204620

Marlon Gancino 1, Nelson Santiago Vispo 2
1.Facultad de Salud, NANOMED EMJMD, Universidad de París, Francia
alx.gancino@gmail.com
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4758-2645
2. Profesor. Universidad Tecnológica de Yachay, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas e Ingeniería, Hda. San José s/n y Proyecto Yachay, 100119, Urcuquí, . Ecuador.
nvispo@yachaytech.edu.ec
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4081-3984
Back to content