Bionatura
Bionatura
Latin American Journal of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
Latin American Journal of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
Go to content
2020.06.01.33
Files > Volume 6 > Vol 6 No 1 2021
BIOETHICS /BIOÉTICA
Previous / Index /

Bioethical and biopolitical considerations concerning racism and the COVID-19 pandemic in Chile
 
Raúl Villarroel
Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.21931/RB/2021.06.01.33

 
ABSTRACT
 
An analysis that is also bioethical and biopolitical -and not solely biomedical- of the deleterious effects of the current planetary viral catastrophe will allow us to understand that human life, for a long time and in many different ways, has been edging closer to the abyss. The present situation of pandemic seriously affect to those nations in which the healthcare structures are more deficient and suffer a lack of sufficient resources to attend to the critically ill or the most poverty-stricken populations on the planet.
Keywords: Pandemic - Covid 19 – Migration – Prejudice - Chile
 

Given the great shockwaves caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which in recent months has shaken the whole world, there is cause to suspect that this may have led to the perceptual error that the pandemic is exclusively a health-related issue. Given that this perceptual error is not insignificant, it must be addressed reflectively and critically.
 
That is, there appears to be is a worldwide perception that the pandemic relates only to the outbreak of an unforeseen and fatal anomaly in the infinitesimal order of organic life. In doing so we may be obfuscating the political and economic dimensions that define the capitalist world order. Moreover, if we also allow ourselves to consider the fact that, in the current historical context, scientific research has assumed the form of a hegemonic program of management and control of human life, undeniably linked to the objectives and interests of that same global capital, this forces us to ask many unsettling questions regarding the prospects for purely scientific solutions to the crisis.
 
To completely depoliticize the analysis of this pandemic and reduce it to the simple dramatic and statistical exposition of its morbid expression—which is indeed extremely distressing—as authorities and mass media report, causes us to lose sight of a dimension that perhaps explains the problem more accurately. For this reason, I feel that we should not err by falling into an anodyne indulgence and end up acquiescent to the idea that everything has just been some sort of "fatal destiny" that has befallen humanity. Doubtless there will be very particular political—and perhaps even personal—responsibilities which will at some point have to be established in relation to its causes, particularly the responsibility of all those who today seem to show more concern for the recovery of the economy than the health of the population.
 


In this respect, an analysis that is also bioethical and biopolitical—and not solely biomedical—of the deleterious effects of the current planetary viral catastrophe will allow us to understand that human life, for a long time and in many different ways, has been edging closer to an abyss, perhaps today more than ever. As Michel Foucault once stated, "the biological is reflected in the political" (Foucault 1991:172). This perspective requires that we deconstruct the judicial-institutional power structure of neoliberalism on which the social order has sought to sustain itself and which has established a damagingly unequal economic model. It is a historical condition that has favored the growing and extreme worsening of the COVID-19 pandemic we are currently witnessing. As Judith Butler recently stated, the situation can also be described as "pandemic capitalism" (Butler 2020).
 
In situations of health resource scarcity and increasingly complex predictive models for infection, it is hard to guarantee that health systems in poorer countries possess the necessary intensive care treatment for all those who may need it (Aurenque et al. 2020). Given that the present situation is governed by market rationality, the only calculating strategy is to ask "Which lives are more worth saving than others?"
 
Clearly, the lethality of the virus, its systemic and disastrous impact in the long term, will most likely be felt by those nations in which the healthcare structures are generally more deficient. It is in those nations where the continuance or the abrupt termination of citizens' lives often depends on either the good will of medical professionals or their personal bioethical codes.
 
Now, unquestionably, among the globe's most deprived demographic segments, there are migrants and displaced persons who have fled their countries of origin to seek less precarious life conditions. They may, for example, seek to escape economic vulnerability deriving from the shortage of employment that exists in their homelands. This fuels high expectations to secure better opportunities for work in new countries, providing the possibility of earning incomes considerably greater than those they would have received prior to migrating, with the added potential of a gradual improvement in the wellbeing of family members with whom they migrate and those who remain in their country of origin.
 
Towards the end of the last century, Chile began to achieve economic success, and made significant progress in the processes of modernization, allowing it to occupy a position of some political and economic supremacy within Latin American. The country then began to see a significant increase in migration to fill the gap in unskilled labor. Until very recently (prior to the social explosion of October 18 2019),1 Chile had sought to understand itself as a culturally homogeneous nation—European even—and an exception from the Latin American context (Correa 2016:43). In tandem with the growing wave of migration, in recent years, a seed of racism has begun to grow in within the Chilean population, and revealing xenophobic attitudes and behavioral tendencies which Chileans might not have understood as forming part of their experience (Canales 2019). This has worsened the already precarious situation of migrants (even more so in the global context of the 2020 pandemic). In this respect, it can be said that the stigmatization to which they have been subjected in the past has acquired a new and more pronounced quality at present.
 
For example, Chilean media have focused mainly on the country's Metropolitan Region where COVID-19 infections are primarily concentrated. In this context, it is common to see political authorities interviewed on television emphatically denouncing those living in low-income communities—where migrants normally live— stressing their careless approach to healthcare behaviors (i.e., failure to observe quarantines, lack of social distancing, not using masks and others instances of this kind), while, curiously, simultaneously reacting much less emphatically in regard to these behaviors when they are observed among people living in the city's high-income areas. Thus, migrants, especially the racialized and poor, are now much more subject to stereotyping, forms of discriminatory social control, and expressions of moral sanction in the context of the pandemic. An extreme manifestation of their conditions of marginalization are painfully expressed in their desperation to return to their countries of origin: At the same time that the health crisis is depriving them of the life they have cultivated in Chile, they find themselves obligated to camp in the very worst conditions for weeks outside of their respective embassies to beg for repatriation.
 
Since the coronavirus outbreak began, the cameras of Chilean TV channels have focused heavily on the districts inhabited by the people with the lowest incomes in the city of Santiago—Haitian immigrants mostly, but also Dominicans, Peruvians, Bolivians, and more—gathering sensational material with headlines such as, "Virus outbreak in Haitian migrant community," quickly becoming big stories. Thus, the virus's presence becomes dramatically racialized, and this is accomplished through a strange fusion—or confusion, rather—of the disease, ethnicity, and the places of residence of the poorest people. The camps—precarious human settlements often situated on the outskirts, far from the center, and inhabited by many poor non-nationals in overcrowded conditions, have been subjected to very similar media treatment (Ramírez 2020).
 
It seems complicated for Chileans to imagine that whoever passes on the coronavirus could be someone close to you. That perhaps this is why they attempt to seek out a non-national "other" whose body can be considered as a pathogen in terms of both epidemiology and poverty. The point is, therefore, that under these circumstances, blame and causation are directed at migrants for propagating the virus. This cannot be a mere coincidence (Tijoux 2020).
 
Lastly, it needs to be pointed out that these kinds of prejudices against migrants unleash social violence, aggression, and prejudicial attitudes that lead to a hatred of difference and produce offensive attitudes that bring, in the end, an only misfortune that in this case manifests in the social death that looms over the precarious lives of migrants from the moment of their arrival in Chile, and which only exacerbates that other type of imminent death that lurks in the pandemic.
 

CONCLUSION
 
 
Among the globe's most deprived populational segments, there are to be found numerous groups of migrants and displaced persons. Prejudices against migrants unleash social violence, aggressivity, or attitudes that lead to a hatred of difference. In this case, this mainly manifests in the social death that looms over the precarious lives of migrants from the moment of their arrival in Chile, and which only exacerbates that other type of imminent death that lurks in the pandemic.
 
 
 
REFERENCES
 
1.  Foucault M. Historia de la sexualidad. Vol. 1 La voluntad de saber. Madrid: Siglo XXI; 1995.
 
2.  Butler J. La pandemia, el futuro y una duda: ¿qué es lo que hace que la vida sea vivible? La vaca 2 de junio 2020. Available from: https://www.lavaca.org/notas/judith-butler-la-pandemia-el-futuro-y-una-duda-que-es-lo-que-hace-que-la-vida-sea-vivible/?fbclid=IwAR2fi25JUmaeY2Gi21oRHI4op2tVKdfNu_lHJS-Vwg9hJHdzrLx2304fbpo (Accessed November 11 2020).
 
3.  Aurenque D, Espinosa M, Lecaros J A, Loewe D y Villarroel R. Ethical-medical orientations for the attention of critical patients in the COVID-19 pandemic context. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics. 2020. Primero en línea para vol 12, 2021. https://www.url.edu/sites/default/files/content/file/2020/06/02/68/a11-aurenque-et-al-covid-19_2.pdf
 
4. Franklin J. Chile protesters: 'We are subjugated by the rich. It's time for that to end'. The Guardian. 30 de octubre 2019. Available from: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/30/chile-protests-portraits-protesters-sebastian-pinera (Accessed November 11 2020).
 
5.    Correa J. La inmigración como ‘problema’ o el resurgir de la Raza. Racismo general, racismo cotidiano y su papel en la conformación de la Nación. En: Tijoux, M. E. (ed.). Racismo en Chile. La piel como marca de inmigración. Santiago: Editorial Universitaria; 2016. p. 35-47.
 
6.    Canales A. Migración, inclusión y cohesión social. Viejos y nuevos debates en torno a la xenofobia y la discriminación en Chile. May 29 2019. Presentación en Seminario internacional Inclusión y cohesión social en el marco de la Agenda 2030 para el desarrollo sostenible. Claves para un desarrollo social inclusivo en América Latina. Sala Celso Furtado, CEPAL Santiago de Chile, May 28-29, 2019.
 
7.    Ramírez C. Discursos anti-inmigración y su posición privilegiada en los medios: una amenaza a la convivencia. CIPER. 20 de mayo 2020.  Disponible en: https://ciperchile.cl/2020/05/20/discursos-anti-inmigracion-y-su-posicion-privilegiada-en-los-medios-una-amenaza-a-la-convivencia/ (Accessed November 11 2020)
 
8.    Tijoux M E. Racismo chileno en tiempos de pandemia. Le monde diplomatique, edición chilena. Junio 2020. Disponible en: https://www.lemondediplomatique.cl/2020/06/racismo-chileno-en-tiempos-de-pandemia.html (Accessed November 11 2020).
 

Received: 15 november 2020
Accepted :3 january 2021
 
 
Raul Villarroel
Phd. in Philosophy. University of Chile. Department of Philosophy and the Center for Applied Ethics Studies of the Faculty of Philosophy and Humanities
Corresponding author: rvillarr@uchile.cl
BIOETHICS /BIOÉTICA
Previous / Index /

Consideraciones bioéticas y biopolíticas sobre el racismo y la pandemia de COVID-19 en Chile
Raúl Villarroel
Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.21931/RB/2021.06.01.33
RESUMEN
 
Un análisis que sea al mismo tiempo bioético y biopolítico -y no únicamente biomédico- de los deletéreos efectos de la actual catástrofe viral planetaria, nos permitirá comprender que la vida humana, durante mucho tiempo y de muchas formas distintas, se ha ido acercando al abismo. La actual situación pandémica afecta gravemente a aquellas naciones en las que las estructuras sanitarias son más deficientes y hay carencia de recursos para atender a las poblaciones críticamente enfermas o más empobrecidas del planeta.
Palabras clave: Pandemia, Covid-19, Migración, Racismo, Chile.
 
Dadas las grandes ondas de choque provocadas por la pandemia del coronavirus (COVID-19), que en los últimos meses ha sacudido al mundo entero, hay motivos para sospechar que esto puede haber llevado a una errónea percepción de que la pandemia es un tema exclusivamente de salud. Dado que esto no es insignificante, debe abordarse de manera reflexiva y crítica.
 
Es decir, parece haber una percepción mundial de que la pandemia se relaciona sólo con el estallido de una anomalía imprevista y fatal en el orden infinitesimal de la vida orgánica. Al tener esta percepción podríamos estar ofuscando las dimensiones políticas y económicas que definen el orden mundial capitalista. Además, si nos permitimos considerar el hecho de que, en el contexto histórico actual, la investigación científica ha tomado la forma de un programa hegemónico de manejo y control de la vida humana, indiscutiblemente vinculado a los objetivos e intereses de ese mismo capital global, esto nos obliga a plantearnos muchas preguntas inquietantes sobre las perspectivas de soluciones puramente científicas a la crisis.
 
Despolitizar por completo el análisis de esta pandemia y reducirlo a la simple exposición dramática y estadística de su morbosa expresión -en verdad sumamente angustiante- como informan las autoridades y los medios de comunicación, hace que perdamos de vista una dimensión que quizás explique con mayor precisión el problema. Por esta razón, siento que no debemos errar cayendo en una indulgencia anodina y terminar aceptando complacientemente la idea de que todo ha sido una especie de “destino fatal” que ha caído sobre la humanidad. Sin duda, habrá responsabilidades políticas muy particulares -y tal vez incluso personales- que en algún momento deberán establecerse en relación con sus causas, particularmente la responsabilidad de todos aquellos que hoy parecen mostrar más preocupación por la recuperación de la economía que por la salud de la población.

 
En este sentido, un análisis que sea bioético y biopolítico- y no solamente biomédico- de los efectos perjudiciales de la actual catástrofe viral planetaria nos permitirá entender que la vida humana, por mucho tiempo y de variadas maneras, se ha ido acercando a un abismo, quizás hoy más que nunca. Como Michael Foucault alguna vez dijo: “lo biológico se refleja en lo político.”1 Esta perspectiva requiere deconstruir la estructura de poder judicial-institucional del neoliberalismo sobre la que el orden social ha buscado sustentarse y que ha establecido un modelo económico dañinamente desigual. Es una condición histórica que ha favorecido el creciente y extremo agravamiento de la pandemia de COVID-19 que actualmente presenciamos. Como Judith Butler afirmó recientemente, la situación también puede describirse como “capitalismo pandémico”2.
 
En situaciones de escasez de recursos sanitarios y modelos predictivos de infección cada vez más complejos, es difícil garantizar que los sistemas de salud de los países más pobres cuenten con el tratamiento de cuidados intensivos adecuado para todos aquellos que puedan necesitarlo3. Dado que la situación actual se rige por la racionalidad del mercado, la única estrategia de cálculo es preguntar "¿Qué vidas valen más la pena salvar?"
 
Claramente, la letalidad del virus, su desastroso y sistémico impacto a largo plazo, probablemente hará estragos más profundos en aquellas naciones cuyos sistemas de salud son generalmente más deficientes. Es en aquellas naciones donde la continuidad o la terminación abrupta de la vida de los ciudadanos depende a menudo de la buena voluntad de los profesionales médicos o de sus códigos bioéticos personales.
 
Ahora, sin duda, entre los segmentos demográficos más desfavorecidos del mundo, hay migrantes y personas desplazadas que han huido de sus países de origen en busca de condiciones de vida menos precarias. Por ejemplo, pueden estar buscando escapar de la vulnerabilidad económica derivada de la escasez de empleo en sus países de origen. Esto genera altas expectativas para asegurar mejores oportunidades de trabajo en nuevos países, brindando la posibilidad de obtener ingresos considerablemente mayores que los que recibirían si no migraran, con el potencial de una mejora gradual del bienestar de los familiares con quienes migran y de los que se han quedado en sus países de origen.
 
Hacia fines del siglo pasado, Chile comenzó a alcanzar el éxito económico y avanzó significativamente en los procesos de modernización, lo que le permitió ocupar una posición de cierta supremacía política y económica dentro de América Latina. Luego, el país comenzó a ver un aumento significativo en la migración para llenar el vacío en la mano de obra no calificada. Hasta hace muy poco tiempo (antes de la explosión social del 18 de octubre de 2019)4, Chile había buscado entenderse a sí mismo como una nación culturalmente homogénea, incluso europea, y una excepción del contexto latinoamericano.5 En los últimos años, paralelamente a la creciente ola migratoria, una semilla de racismo ha comenzado a crecer dentro de la población chilena, revelando actitudes xenófobas y tendencias de comportamiento que los chilenos tal vez no hayan entendido como parte de su experiencia6. Esto ha empeorado la ya precaria situación de los migrantes (más aún en el contexto global de la pandemia de 2020). En este sentido, se puede decir que la estigmatización a la que han sido sometidos en el pasado ha adquirido una cualidad nueva y más acentuada en la actualidad.
 
Por ejemplo, los medios chilenos se han enfocado principalmente en el Región Metropolitana del país donde se concentran principalmente las infecciones por COVID-19. En este contexto, es común ver a las autoridades políticas siendo entrevistadas en televisión denunciando enfáticamente a quienes viven en comunidades de bajos ingresos –donde generalmente viven personas inmigrantes- haciendo hincapié sobre las pocas medidas de seguridad sanitaria que acatan (es decir, incumplimiento de cuarentenas, falta de distanciamiento social, no usar mascarilla u otras medidas preventivas de ese tipo) mientras que, curiosamente, reaccionan mucho menos enfáticamente con respecto a estos comportamientos cuando se observan entre personas que viven en las zonas de altos ingresos de la ciudad. Por lo tanto, los migrantes, especialmente los racializados negativamente y los pobres, están ahora mucho más sujetos a estereotipos, formas de control social discriminatorio y expresiones de sanción moral en el contexto de la pandemia. Una manifestación extrema de estas condiciones de marginalización se expresa de manera dolorosa en su desesperación por regresar a sus países de origen. Al mismo tiempo que la crisis de salud los está privando de la vida que han hecho en Chile, se ven obligados a acampar durante semanas en las peores condiciones fuera de sus embajadas para pedir repatriación.
 
Desde que la pandemia por coronavirus comenzó, las cámaras de los canales de televisión chilenos, se han concentrado fuertemente en los distritos habitados por personas de más bajos ingresos en la ciudad de Santiago –principalmente inmigrantes haitianos, pero también dominicanos, peruanos, bolivianos y otros- recabando material de tipo sensacionalista con titulares como: “El virus se desata entre la comunidad de inmigrantes haitianos”, que rápidamente se convierten en noticia. Por lo tanto, la presencia del virus se racializa de manera dramática, y esto sucede a través de una extraña fusión –o incluso confusión-entre la enfermedad, la etnicidad y los lugares de residencia de las personas más pobres. Los campamentos -asentamientos humanos precarios a menudo situados en las afueras, lejos del centro y habitados por muchos no nacionales pobres en condiciones de hacinamiento- han sido sometidos a un tratamiento mediático muy similar.7
 
Para los chilenos parece difícil imaginar que quien transmita el coronavirus pueda ser alguien cercano. Quizás por eso intentan buscar un “otro” no nacional cuyo cuerpo pueda ser considerado patógeno en términos tanto de epidemiología como de pobreza. El punto es, por lo tanto, que en estas circunstancias, la culpa y la causalidad se dirigen a los migrantes por propagar el virus. Esto no puede ser una mera coincidencia8.
 
Por último, cabe señalar que este tipo de prejuicios contra los migrantes desencadenan violencia social, agresión y actitudes prejuiciosas que conducen al odio a la diferencia y producen actitudes ofensivas que, al final, sólo traen desgracia que en este caso se manifiesta en la muerte social que se cierne sobre la precaria vida de los migrantes desde el momento de su llegada a Chile, y que no hace más que exacerbar ese otro tipo de muerte inminente que acecha en la pandemia.
 

CONCLUSIÓN
 
Entre los segmentos de población más desfavorecidos del mundo, se encuentran numerosos grupos de migrantes y personas desplazadas. Los prejuicios contra los migrantes desencadenan violencia social, agresividad o actitudes que conducen al odio a la diferencia. En este caso, esto se manifiesta principalmente en la muerte social que se cierne sobre la precaria vida de los migrantes desde el momento de su llegada a Chile, y que solo exacerba ese otro tipo de muerte inminente que acecha en la pandemia.
 
 

REFERENCES

1.  Foucault M. Historia de la sexualidad. Vol. 1 La voluntad de saber. Madrid: Siglo XXI; 1995.
2.  Butler J. La pandemia, el futuro y una duda: ¿qué es lo que hace que la vida sea vivible? La vaca 2 de junio 2020. Available from: https://www.lavaca.org/notas/judith-butler-la-pandemia-el-futuro-y-una-duda-que-es-lo-que-hace-que-la-vida-sea-vivible/?fbclid=IwAR2fi25JUmaeY2Gi21oRHI4op2tVKdfNu_lHJS-Vwg9hJHdzrLx2304fbpo (Accessed November 11 2020).
3.  Aurenque D, Espinosa M, Lecaros J A, Loewe D y Villarroel R. Ethical-medical orientations for the attention of critical patients in the COVID-19 pandemic context. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics. 2020. Primero en línea para vol 12, 2021. https://www.url.edu/sites/default/files/content/file/2020/06/02/68/a11-aurenque-et-al-covid-19_2.pdf
4. Franklin J. Chile protesters: 'We are subjugated by the rich. It's time for that to end'. The Guardian. 30 de octubre 2019. Available from: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/30/chile-protests-portraits-protesters-sebastian-pinera (Accessed November 11 2020).
5.    Correa J. La inmigración como ‘problema’ o el resurgir de la Raza. Racismo general, racismo cotidiano y su papel en la conformación de la Nación. En: Tijoux, M. E. (ed.). Racismo en Chile. La piel como marca de inmigración. Santiago: Editorial Universitaria; 2016. p. 35-47.
6.    Canales A. Migración, inclusión y cohesión social. Viejos y nuevos debates en torno a la xenofobia y la discriminación en Chile. May 29 2019. Presentación en Seminario internacional Inclusión y cohesión social en el marco de la Agenda 2030 para el desarrollo sostenible. Claves para un desarrollo social inclusivo en América Latina. Sala Celso Furtado, CEPAL Santiago de Chile, May 28-29, 2019.
7.    Ramírez C. Discursos anti-inmigración y su posición privilegiada en los medios: una amenaza a la convivencia. CIPER. 20 de mayo 2020.  Disponible en: https://ciperchile.cl/2020/05/20/discursos-anti-inmigracion-y-su-posicion-privilegiada-en-los-medios-una-amenaza-a-la-convivencia/ (Accessed November 11 2020)
8.    Tijoux M E. Racismo chileno en tiempos de pandemia. Le monde diplomatique, edición chilena. Junio 2020. Disponible en: https://www.lemondediplomatique.cl/2020/06/racismo-chileno-en-tiempos-de-pandemia.html (Accessed November 11 2020).


Recivido: 15 Noviembre 2020
Aceptado:3 Enero 2021
Raúl Villarroel
Doctor en Filosofía. Universidad de Chile. Departamento de Filosofía y del Centro de Estudios de Ética Aplicada de la Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades.
Autor de correspondencia: rvillarr@uchile.cl
Back to content